Going Places Cotswolds
Going Places Cotswolds
4.5
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Chipping Campden, Inglaterra

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4.5
19 opiniones
Excelente
12
Muy bueno
5
Promedio
2
Mala
0
Horrible
0

Voyager748545
12 aportes
mar. de 2017 • Pareja
ヒースローからレンタカーで行きましたが、結構遠かったです。
街は可愛らしく、女性なら大満足するでしょう。
オックスフォードも近いので、アウトレットに寄れます
Escrita el 7 de enero de 2018
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

tomosansan
6 aportes
ago. de 2016 • Solitario
天気も良く気持ちいい風景でした。
素敵な庭や、はちみつ色の建物など英国の田舎って感じの雰囲気に満足しました。
途中に寄った場所で食べたフィッシュアンドチップスが最高に美味しかったです。
Escrita el 18 de octubre de 2016
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

akiko898
Nagoya-shi, Aichi, Japan199 aportes
ago. de 2015 • Familia
私は何度か訪れていますが主人が初めてだったので是非見てほしいと訪れました。 蜂蜜色の石が雨に濡れてしっとりと並んで建っている家々が素敵です。いつ訪れても同じ景色が落ち着きますね。
Escrita el 24 de septiembre de 2015
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

sanglier13
Koksijde, Bélgica1.257 aportes
may. de 2015
Magnifique petit village dans la campagne du Cotsworld, mais très touristique et fréquenté. A visiter à pied pour faire le tour du village.
Escrita el 22 de septiembre de 2015
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

ninniku2014
埼玉95 aportes
ago. de 2014 • Pareja
バスツアーでバーフォード、バイブリー、ボートン・オン・ザ・ウォーター、ブロードウェイを訪問。それぞれの街に特徴がありました。コッツウォルズには他にも多くの街がありますので、泊りがけで色々と見て回るのも良いかもしれませんが、日帰りでも雰囲気を味わうことは出来たと思います。
Escrita el 16 de junio de 2015
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

Margaret42Wright
Beverley, UK136 aportes
jul. de 2014 • Amigos
I walked the Cotswold Way we walked from Chipping Campde to Broadway and ate our picnic lunch beside the Market Hall (built in 1617 in Chipping Campden. It is a beautiful old town built of biscuit coloured stone. We had a steep climb out of Chipping Campden up to the top of the escarpment with spectacular views to our right. We walked across Dover's Hill, a broad expanse of flat grassland on the top of the escarpment, which was the site of the local "Olympic Games" from 1612 to 1852. There were lots of lovely wild flowers out in the sunshine. The next feature The Mile Drive a wide avenue of turf along the top of the ridge brought us to arable fields. Broadway Tower is quite a high spot an eighteenth century folly dominating the valley, with a herd of red deer including a magnificent stag, grazing nearby. A short walk took us down into Broadway by a very steep descent. After a lovely breakfast at our B&B we were driven to Broadway for our first full day's walking - 11.75 miles, which seems considerably longer, a real test of strength as it was very hilly. But a bright sunny morning lifted our spirits as we trudged out of Broadway up the hill and along the escarpment. There were lovely views again and several other walkers. Our path led down to Stanton village through a wood valley with many horses grazing. Stanton is delightful with wonderful yellow stone houses and ramble roses everywhere, but very quiet and obviously undiscovered, in contrast to Broadway, which bristles with antique shops and tourist souvenirs. After a peaceful picnic lunch in Stanton churchyard and a look round the beautiful church we continued along the valley to the next village of Stanway. It was very pleasant walking but we had to circumnavigate two bulls among their families. The façade of Syanway House looked very fine but we didn't have time to stop and went on to Wood Stanway (more pretty houses and roses0 and then uphill past a trekking stables. There followed a long climb upwards through fields of sheep and horses. There was a fat pony at one gate who refused to move to let us through - we hade to squeeze past him. Then we had a relatively easy walk down through the woods to the ruins of Hailes Abbey, then went back across the fields to Winchcombe.. Winchcombe to Dowdeswell Reservoir - we had been warned by the locals that this was the toughest day yet with lots of hills of great steepness. However,we were not daunted as the book said it was only 11.1/4 miles. We left Winchcombe in a light drizzle accompanied by two other walkers who had been staying at our B&B. We slowly climbed the steep slope frequently looking back down to Studley Castle - a very grand building. It was a long, tough climb oast a farm and Humblebee Cottage, through woodss to come out on to the top at Belas Knap, a New Stone Age Burial Mound of 2500 BC. A large impressive structure, well restored, it provided shelter for us to have a coffee break in the entrance chamber out of the rain. The next stage took us over the hilltops to Cleeve Common, a wild area of wasteland where we had been warned we could lose our way. However, it was well marked with white posts. Gorse, sheep and old quarry workings dominated, with lovely flowers underfoot, particularly rock roses, milkwort in three colours and heath bedstraw. It was rough walling down into a deep valley with a waterhole and then we had a big struggle uphill through a deserted landscape only to find at the top a golf course. Here we collapsed and ate our lunch looking down on Cheltenham below in the sunshine, with the racecourse in the foreground. The rain stopped as we made a gradual descent into Happy Valley home to several nature reserves and a wealth of flowers and butterflies. Common spotted orchids and twayblades seems to be everywhere, but more exciting were three rare (and related) flowers - crown vetch, horseshoe vetch and sainfoin. Woodland lanes took us fown through Dowdeswell Woods by a very steep ;path, fortunately dry underfoot, under a sizzling power line down to the reservoir and the Waterside Inn. After a welcome cold drink in the pub we set off to our B&B in Randwick village. The Waterside Inn to Birdlip turned out to be a long hard struggle about 12 miles instead of the projected 10.1/4, we started off uphill, with fine views of the valley to look back on. Our path led us into a wood where a group of lesser butterfly orchids caused great excitement. This was going to be a botanist's dream day with masses of common spotted orchids, twayblades and many others. A very touigh climb took us up into a path perilously close to a steep drop into the valley. As we were clinging to the hillside two girls runners pounded past us oblivious of any danger. We ate our lunch in the sunshine beside a field with three handsome horses who leaned over the electric fence for titbits. We crossed the main road at Seven Springs and then had a pleasant walk along the escarpment edge, busy with local folk. We could see Gloucester from here and the artificial ski slope on the hillside above. Everyone was bearing up well, the Devil's Chimney,is a rocky pillar posed on the cliff edge. The final section was a long trek through woods behind a small girl on a pony - she couldn't have been more than three and was being led by two other girls. It seemed to go lon forever. We were getting very tired by now and concerned that we were going to be late reaching our B&B. We had a good evening meal at the village pub. The Vine Tree, although it was a stiff climb up the hill to reach it. Birdlip to Randwick a daunting 13.1/2 miles today. It had rained all night and, although it was clear by morning the way through the woods was very muddy with occasional showers of water as the breeze shook the beech trees overhead. We followed the escarpment edge through woodland were there were lovely wild flowers, as always, including white helleborine. Occasional glimpses into the valley gave wide views including the ground plan of an excavated Roman villa. At Cooper's Hill, a small high settlement where some ambitious building work was going on, we saw the maypole and the site of the annual Whit Monday cheese rolling, apparently a most dangerous activity. Apparently the cheeses are launched over the edge of the steep hill and thenn the competitors race down after them. More walking through woods and our path took us into Painswick a beautiful old town with a remarkable churchyard. It contains wonderful carved tombs and 99 yew trees sculpted into bulbous globes. The afternoon's walk was firstly through fields - we passed the "Bath 55 miles" sign in the middle of one, then uphill to the escarpment edge where in one sloping meadow we found four different kinds of orchids in abundance - early purples, twayblades, lesser butterflies and common spotted, the latter in hundreds. Esdcarpment walking again through the woods intil we emerged at Haresfield Beacon with a magnificent view all down the Severn Valley. We continued, hurrying along until we reached Standish Wood, just above Randwick and on to our B&B. A long tiring but excellent day. Randwick to north Nibley. We set off on a 13 mile trek, firstly up a steep trak to rejoin the Cotswolds. It was a warm sunny morning as we came down through fields to cross the A419 and the Stroudwater Canal. We passed Stanley ill, a handsome brick-built woollen mill with fine Venetian style windows -m still operational.. Aafter crossing the valley floor, we climbed steeply through woods to follow a long level path with occasional glimpses through the trees of the valley and the Severn Estuary. The afternoon walk was firstly through woods and then very steeply downhill (this being the site of the Utley Bury hill fort) andthen ahead we saw the long steep climb up Cam Long Down. It was a hard climb up Cam Long Down but well worth it as a long grassy path running along the top have wonderful views on each side - the valley on the left, the estuary on the right and distantly ahead, the Tyndale Monument.We skirted the next huill instead of going over it and then descended into Dursley, a rather scruffy little town, but with an impressive church and market hall in the middle. We set out from the Black Horse Inn straight uphill heading for the Tyndale Monument.. It is an impressive tall tower built to commemorate Wm Tyndale, martyr and translator of the bible who was from nearby and of course it is on the top of the highest hill. Then we went through woods; after a night of rain and more forecast, we were surprised when the sun came out. We came out of the wood onto a grassy hillside with a stand of conifers, planted to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo. Next came a very attractive river walk where we toiled uphill again onto the escarpment.. Niow we could see the Tyndale Monument behind us and ahead the Somerset Monument our destination for the day.The afternoon's walk was easier going on the lower levels of the escarpment but muddy, through Alderley and Kilcott Mill, formerly a wool producing area rivalling Yorkshire, allegedly. After a gently wealk across fields and an uphill stretch on the road we were at the Somerset Monument in Howkesbury Upton. It is not as imposing as Tyndale's Monument but very high and with an ornate pagoda-style summit. Lord Robert Somerset served at Waterloo - was this all?..15 miles today on a lovely morning we were on our way. An easy start of fields and tracks brought us down to Horton Court a National Trust property. We passed through Little Sodbury, and then, in order tio avoid traversing another hill fort, we took the low level alternative, got lost, took a chance on a different path southwards and plunged on hoping it would take us to Old Sodbury. Next stop was Tomarton village where we ate lunch in a pretty meadow next to a donkey sanctuary. We headed across the fields to Dyrham Park and then onwards to Grenville Monument a long treck downhill followed by another slog uphill. Up through Dyrham Wood, over two busy roads, diagonally across a field of shoulder high rape in seed and we were in Cold Ashton, We set off down the valley towards Sir Bevil Grenville. Our last day and only 4.1/2 miles fasr from being an imposing clumn it is quite a simple monument hidden in woods on Landsdown Hill where Sir Bevil Granville led a charge against Parliamentarian forces during the Civil War. He drove them from the hill but was killed in the fighting. A relaxing morning's walk along the ridge looking down first on Bristol and then on to Bath. A lovely holiday enjoyed by all.
Escrita el 8 de junio de 2015
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

kazumi_ikeda
Yokohama, Japón111 aportes
may. de 2015 • Solitario
コッツウォルズでは首都ロンドンとは別イギリス、ジェントルマンの地方に出会うことができます。一人旅で列車の便がよくないので一日観光ツアーに参加し、バーフォード、バイブリー、ボートンオンザウォーターとブロードワェイを回りました。羊毛で栄えた地方が産業の衰退とともにそのまま残り、ウィリアム・モリスによる再発見とナショナルトラスト運動により古き良きイギリスの田舎として今に伝わったもので、ある意味、大掛かりな博物館であり、観光資源でもあります。バーフォードでは白鳥に混じり、黒鳥に会いました。ブラックスワンは珍しいものの喩なのにびっくり。またバイブリーでフルーツケーキ、ボートンオンザウォーターで紅茶、ブロードワェイでは記念に写真集を購入しました。友人によれば金と時間に余裕があって特にグループであれば、レンタカーを借り、B&Bに泊まりながら回る、あるいはタクシーを貸し切るのが良いそうです(うらやましい)。
Escrita el 3 de junio de 2015
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

Shelley W
Leeds, UK19 aportes
sept. de 2014 • Pareja
Pretty village with some good examples of period thatched property, lovely sunny day helped with feel good factor, gift shops ect, worth a look if in the area.
Escrita el 22 de septiembre de 2014
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

Wytze H
Rosmalen, Países Bajos135 aportes
ago. de 2014 • Pareja
We walked the Cotswold Way, after having completed the Hadrians Wall walk and the Cornwall Coastal Path before. We walked from Chipping Campden to Bath for ten days.
Aged 69 and 67 the distance was no problem for us. Sometimes the track can be challenging because of the muddy soil and/or the steep climbs.
Whe had reservations for hotels and B&B, including luggage transfer from Cotswold Walks.
This is one of the glorious walks in the British countryside, where you can combine walking with visits to gardens, manors and musea.
But beware: Great Britain continues to be affected by The Weather, when it is raining this can
be a soaking experience.
Advice: Please instruct the British Dogs to refrain from poo-ing at the midline of the Path, respecting a distance of at least 1 yard. Thank you
Escrita el 5 de septiembre de 2014
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

由香里 村
Oita, Japón231 aportes
jun. de 2014
可愛らしいお家が並んでてまるで小人が住んでそうな雰囲気でした。
レンタカーで行ったのですが駐車場が少ないのでみんな縦列駐車で路駐してました。
イギリスに行ったら絶対見ておくべき観光スポットです。
Escrita el 2 de agosto de 2014
Esta opinión es la opinión subjetiva de un miembro de Tripadvisor, no de Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor les hace controles a todas las opiniones.

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